Acupuncture NYC

Holistic healing for stress and pain relief in New York

Acupuncture Therapy in New York

Conditions Treated by Acupuncture 
The following is a partial list of conditions that respond well to acupuncture:

Substance Addictions: Smoking cessation, alcoholism, Rx dependence
Mental & Emotional Conditions: Stress, anxiety, depression, insomnia
Upper Respiratory Tract: Acute sinusitis and rhinitis, Common cold and flu, Acute tonsillitis
Respiratory Tract:Acute bronchitis, Asthma
Neurological Disorders: Trigeminal neuralgia, Bell's palsy (early stage), Post stroke paralysis (early stage), Peripheral neuropathy, Meniere’s disease, Tinnitus
G.I. Disorders: Acid reflux, Constipation, Diarrhea, Hiccups, Esophageal spasms, Bloating
Musculoskeletal Disorders: Back pain, Knee pain, Frozen shoulder, Tennis elbow, Sciatica, Osteoarthritis, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue, Torn tendon
GYN Conditions: Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS), Painful periods, Excessive bleeding, loss of menstrual period, infertility
Mouth Disorders:TMJ syndrome, Toothache, Dental pain (post-extraction)


How long does it take to get better?
For acupuncture, a minimum of 8 weekly treatments is recommended. Some conditions, especially complex or long-standing disorders, require a more extended course of treatment.  Each case is different, and a thorough intake is required before treatment goals can be determined. 


How often should I get acupuncture?
Acupuncture treatment works best over time with weekly treatments. Once a week is usually sufficient. For severe cases, twice a week may be recommended. Once symptoms are no longer in the acute phase, appointments can be spaced out over a longer period. Eventually I recommend monthly or seasonal treatments to maintain health, and patients may regularly choose to come in for a “tune-up.”

 Will my insurance cover treatments?
Acupuncture is increasingly included in health insurance benefits. I am in-network with Blue Cross Blue Shield and I accept other insurance as an out-of-network provider. Please feel free to contact me for insurance verification.


Dr. Joyce Leung Lilly is a Doctor of Acupuncture and a Licensed Acupuncturist in the State of New York.  Joyce specializes in Men's and Women’s health, mental health and addictions. She treats a wide range of concerns – from pain conditions to emotional concerns such as anxiety and depression to smoking cessation. Joyce is a licensed acupuncturist in the state of New York and is board-certified by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM).  She received her Doctorate degree in Acupuncture at the prestigious Pacific College of Oriental Medicine and currently practices in New York City.

 

During her holistic and integrative healthcare training, Joyce completed internships at NYU Langone Medical Center’s Lutheran Hospital specializing in Stroke Rehabilitation, and Labor and Delivery, as well as NYU Langone's Initiative for Women with Disabilities, and also spent extensive time working at the Yonkers Riverside Drug and Alcohol Treatment Center. She has a strong interest in working on uniting the Mind-Body-Spirit connection as a root to treating diseases and disorders.
 

Dr. Joyce Leung Lilly, DAc LAc     Tel: 646-827-1128


What is this thing called Acupuncture ?

​​​Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture have been the widely accepted and used as medicine and healing therapy in China, & other Asian countries, for thousands of years.  It is effective in treating the roots and causes of diseases and disorders by utilizing the human body’s own resources to heal itself. Chinese medicine is a safe, minimally invasive, systematic, and holistic approach for treating many disorders and illnesses. The approach to healing the body begins with the identification of the underlying imbalance of the body from a physical, emotional, and spiritual view. By bringing the body, mind and spirit back to equilibrium, one's state of health and wellness is restored.


Does acupuncture hurt?
Because the needles are very thin, patients usually only feel a very minor sensation when they are inserted. This sensation indicates the movement of “Qi,” or vital energy, and commonly it feels like a dull ache, an electric pulse, or a feeling of heat spreading.